Sunday, 11 February 2018

ELYE SAVIKOVSKI

ELYE SAVIKOVSKI (1893-1959/1960)
            He was born on an estate near the town of Polyanka, Byelorussia.  Until age fourteen, he studied Jewish subject matter, thereafter secular subjects in private.  He was living in Minsk, where in the 1920s he was editorial secretary of Farn folk (For the people) and manager of the information division of Shtern (Star) and Veker (Alarm).  He debuted in print with poetry in the weekly Erev shabes (Sabbath eve) in Warsaw (1914) and Dos vort (The word) in St. Petersburg; and he went on to publish later in the anthology Kep (Heads); also in Der yunger pyoner (The young pioneer), Shtern, Veker, Farn folk, and the anthology Af di vegn (On the roads)—in Minsk.  Using the pen names Elisov and Savel, he published feature pieces and notices.  In book form: Farmestenish, lider (Competition, poems) (Minsk, 1924), 64 pp.; Af di vegn (Minsk, 1924); Far yunge zinger, lider (For young singers, songs) (Minsk, 1928), 33 pp.; Erdling, pyese in dray aktn—zeks bilder (Earthling, a play in three acts and six scenes) (Minsk, 1928), 89 pp.; Papirene toybn, kinder-pyese in tsvey stsenes (Paper doves, a children’s play in two scenes) (Minsk, 1934), 34 pp.  In the latter half of the 1930s, his name disappeared, and it was assumed that he had been repressed.  After WWII he emerged in the latter half of the 1950s in Minsk after having been rehabilitated and released from the prisons and camps.  He published poetry in the Warsaw-based Folks-shtime (Voice of the people).  He died in Minsk.

Sources: Zalmen Reyzen, Leksikon, vol. 2; B. Orshanski, in Tsaytshrift (Minsk) 5 (1931); Chone Shmeruk, comp., Pirsumim yehudiim babrit-hamoatsot, 1917-1961 (Jewish publications in the Soviet Union, 1917-1961) (Jerusalem, 1961), see index.
Benyomen Elis

[Additional information from: Chaim Beider, Leksikon fun yidishe shrayber in ratn-farband (Biographical dictionary of Yiddish writers in the Soviet Union), ed. Boris Sandler and Gennady Estraikh (New York: Congress for Jewish Culture, Inc., 2011), p. 254.]


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